52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks #4 – Invite to Dinner

So many of our ancestor’s are worthy of note. Whether it is for their courage, fortitude or spirit, they have a story to tell. The best place to tell that story may be at the family dinner table. We grew up having dinner most every Sunday at my Grandparents home, Bernard and Francis Hancock. All the aunts and uncles and cousins would be there.  Everyone was welcome. You just needed to call Grandma before she went to the meat market on Tennyson, to let her know you would be there. “Dinner” was at 2:00 on Sunday. In the summer we would have picnic’s in the mountains and wade through the creeks and romp the forest trails. Maybe a little wiffle ball.

 

50th Wedding Anniversary Frances and Bernard Hancock

Left to right – Dorothy, Shirley, Pearl, Charlotte, Charlene and Robert. Seated – Bernard, Frances and Evelyn. Celebrating Bernard and Francis’ 50th Anniversary.

 

I can’t say that Grandma was a great cook, but she certainly defined the “feel good” meal. Best fried chicken, best pot roast, best chocolate cake, best lemon meringue pie and molasses cookies are some of the things I remember. Every now and then, in the summer, Grandpa would get out the old wooden churn to make ice cream and at the last minute throw in some fresh peaches.

Hancock Grandkids 1991

Hancock grandkids – Back row – left to right – Sharon, Kenneth, Gary, Bruce, Stephen, Scott and Kent. Kneeling – Karen, Linda, Margaret, Renna, Korbi, Robyn, Cathy Jo. Missing are Don and Carol, Trish, Lauri and Troy, Sandy and Roxanne.

Great Grand Children 1991 -62

Great, Grandkids – Back row standing –  Lindsey (Scott), Ginger (Sharon), Traci (Cathy Jo), Jeffrey and Jason (Bruce),  Danny (Karen), Valerie (Stephen), Amy (Renna), Michele (Robyn), Elizabeth (Renna), Brian (Robyn), Matt (Korbi)(on Brian’s shoulders) and Chad (Renna).  Bottom row – Katie and Chad (Kenneth) Stacey and Brian (Stephen),  Janelle and Nick (Gary).

Times were not always so easy. During World War II, some food wasn’t easy to come by. Not long ago I found a ration book with my mother’s name on it. With seven children to feed from 7 years old to my mother at 18, I’m sure Grandma needed that extra ration book to get the necessary food to keep this family of 9 from going hungry.  Every American was issued a series of ration books during the war. The ration books contained removable stamps good for certain rationed items, like sugar, meat, cooking oil, and canned goods. A person could not buy a rationed item without also giving the grocer the right ration stamp. The books were distributed by a local “board” operated by the Office of Price Administration. “Victory gardens” provided fresh fruit and vegetables. There was always a corner of the back  yard for a garden.

war ration book

 

I will always remember those Sunday afternoons we used to have when we were all together, sharing the best of our everyday lives.

Week #5 – In The Census

 

 

 

 

Advertisements