52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks #6 – Favorite Name

So many names to choose from! There are over 2000 names in my database for family history research which isn’t really very many, but I have kept the database to blood relations only, children, parents, grandparents, great grandparents, etc. For the earlier ancestors I have not included brothers and sisters. Too much information!

My favorite name is really favorite names because I have selected a husband and wife.

Neazer and Thankful Scofield

Neazer (not Ebenezer) was born 22 May 1754 son of Samuel Scofield in Stamford, Fairfield County, Connecticut.

Thankful was born 1 March 1757 daughter of Sylvanus Scofield, in Stamford, Fairfield County, Connecticut.

Neazer and Thankful are my 5x great grandparents. Neazer’s father, Samuel Scofield and Thankful’s father Sylvanus Scofield were brothers. This relationship really screws up the family history program.

The immigrant ancestor for the Scofield’s was Daniel Scofield (my 9x great grandfather) who was born in England and came to America in 1641. He was a founding settler of Stamford, Connecticut. He paid 25 pounds sterling for his land. This Scofield line descends to Levi Scofield a Seventh Day Baptist minister in Janesville, Wisconsin whose daughter Sabrina married Levi Squires father to Edwin and Mary Squires, parents of Grace Irene Squires Foreman, mother of Grandma Hancock.

Thankful Scofield head stone

Neazer and Thankful had 13 children, most born in Stamford, Connecticut but several were born in Hadley, New York.  Thankful died 28 June 1836 at 79 years old in Hadley, Saratoga County, New York.

Neazer Scofield

Neazer died 26 September 1846 at 93 years old. He served as a private in the local militia prior to the Revolutionary War, as a volunteer for 115 days in 1775. He continued to serve in militias in 1776 and enlisted in 1777 and returned to his family 1n 1778.

Thankful Scofield, Gray's Cemetery

Neazer and Thankful are buried in the former Scofield Cemetery now named Gray’s Cemetery in Hadley, Saratoga, New York.

 

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week #7 – Valentine

 

Advertisements

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – #5 – In The Census

In 1998 when I first started searching for ancestors I would visit the library to select the microfilm rolls I needed, insert them in the machine and spend hours scrolling through names in the census records. If I was lucky there would be an index of names that would direct me to the exact roll I was looking for making the search much easier. These days with Ancestry and FamilySearch most of the census records are easy to search from home on the internet.

Some of my favorite discoveries from the census include:

  • Finding middle names. Grace Irene Squires (Foreman) sister was Mary I. Squires (the mother was listed as Mary S. Squires.)  The next census had a more diligent recorder and listed her whole name Mary Ivadine Squires. Grandma Hancock would talk about her aunt Ivy saying she was an old maid because she never married.

Mary Ivedine Squires

Mary Ivadine Squires 1866-1921

  • Finding surnames. I could not find my dad in the 1940 census which was made public in 2010. I kept searching and finally last year found him in Tacoma, Washington under the name Jerry Frahm. His mother Signe Anderson Stalter had remarried. The family had been enumerated with Clarence Frahm as head of household and my dad and his brother Victor were listed as Frahm instead of Stalter. I never knew he lived in Tacoma, Washington. Seven years it took me to find that!

 

Jerry, Clarence, Uncle Frank & Grandpa Anderson

Left to right – Jerry Stalter, Clarence Frahm, Uncle Frank Martin, seated in car is my great grandfather Hinberg Anderson who immigrated in 1892 from Norway. My best guess is this picture was taken about 1937.

  • Finding places. Looking for my grandfather Perry Stalter in 1940. He was divorced from Signe and was listed by himself in a place called Work Camp #3, Glendale, Minnesota. Minnesota does a midterm census so I found him in 1935 in a different work camp.  During the depression men who did not have jobs and no place to live were placed in work camps and trained for jobs or placed on work crews building “public works” projects from bridges to schools and the like. This included art projects and music projects.  Perry wrote lyrics for music, he also wrote poetry. In 1942 he entered Word War II. He also served in World War I. Sometimes gravestones provide a lot of information.

Ft. Snelling Natl Cemetery

  • Finding families. Most of our family lines moved as a group from one part of the country to another. By reading the entire page of the census and going back one page or forward a page you can usually find a brother or father or son with their family listed nearby. The Foreman’s in Illinois all lived within a ten mile radius of each other. Their farms were next to each other. Edwin Squires farm was next to his father, Levi Squires farm in Wisconsin. Daughters were a little harder to track because their names changed, but looking carefully, usually can be found within a short distance of her family.

Robert Allen Foreman Family to Oklahoma copy

This is the Robert Allen Foreman family. They left Time, Illinois and settled in Cherokee, Oklahoma about 1877. At the same time Jacob Foreman, older brother of Robert, left Time, Illinois and settled in Carroll County, Missouri about 250 miles from Time, Illinois. In 1887, Jacob and Sarah Foreman brought their family to Vernon, Colorado to homestead.

Finding a story within ten years. My husbands grandmother Beckie Singer was one of four children. In 1900 I found each of her siblings, a sister Fannie in St. Louis and two brothers, William and Harris living in Friar’s Point, Mississippi. Harris was married to Lizzie and the 1900 census shows they had four children. In the 1910 census there is no listing anywhere for Lizzie and Harris yet two of their children were living with William and his wife in Friar’s Point, Mississippi. With a lot of hard work I found that Harris and Lizzie had moved to San Antonio, Texas and Harris had died of tuberculosis in 1904 in San Antonio. Lizzie had died of tuberculosis in 1908 in San Antonio. In the 1910 census two of the their children are living with William back in Mississippi, one daughter is living with Lizzie’s brother’s family in Memphis Tennessee.  The fourth child, Sarah, shows up in the 1910 Colorado census. She is 18 years old. Sarah contracted tuberculosis in Memphis and moved to Colorado in 1909 for treatment at the JCRS hospital. Sarah died in 1917 in Colorado. JCRS, for many of us who remember, was the name of a shopping center on west Colfax in Lakewood. The entire property was owned by the Jewish Community Relief Society. The synagogue remains behind the shopping center. Both Denver and San Antonio were cities that people with tuberculosis sought treatment.

Several months ago I found Lizzie’s will in a digital collection from Mississippi. The will lists five children. With a lot more digging I found the fifth child, David, born in 1901 and 9 years old in 1910 census,  living in a Jewish orphan’s home in New Orleans. At age 18 he left the orphanage and went to live with his sister in Memphis. After communicating with a member of the board of directors for the history of this orphanage I learned many people in the early 1900’s were dying from tuberculosis and the B’nai B’rith Society placed the surviving children in orphanages to continue their education and religious studies. For me, it was heartbreaking to put this information together and find that an entire family was devastated by this horrible disease.

In 2020 the government will release the 1950 census and it will be fun to look for myself and many of you!

Next week #6 – Favorite Name.

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks #4 – Invite to Dinner

So many of our ancestor’s are worthy of note. Whether it is for their courage, fortitude or spirit, they have a story to tell. The best place to tell that story may be at the family dinner table. We grew up having dinner most every Sunday at my Grandparents home, Bernard and Francis Hancock. All the aunts and uncles and cousins would be there.  Everyone was welcome. You just needed to call Grandma before she went to the meat market on Tennyson, to let her know you would be there. “Dinner” was at 2:00 on Sunday. In the summer we would have picnic’s in the mountains and wade through the creeks and romp the forest trails. Maybe a little wiffle ball.

 

50th Wedding Anniversary Frances and Bernard Hancock

Left to right – Dorothy, Shirley, Pearl, Charlotte, Charlene and Robert. Seated – Bernard, Frances and Evelyn. Celebrating Bernard and Francis’ 50th Anniversary.

 

I can’t say that Grandma was a great cook, but she certainly defined the “feel good” meal. Best fried chicken, best pot roast, best chocolate cake, best lemon meringue pie and molasses cookies are some of the things I remember. Every now and then, in the summer, Grandpa would get out the old wooden churn to make ice cream and at the last minute throw in some fresh peaches.

Hancock Grandkids 1991

Hancock grandkids – Back row – left to right – Sharon, Kenneth, Gary, Bruce, Stephen, Scott and Kent. Kneeling – Karen, Linda, Margaret, Renna, Korbi, Robyn, Cathy Jo. Missing are Don and Carol, Trish, Lauri and Troy, Sandy and Roxanne.

Great Grand Children 1991 -62

Great, Grandkids – Back row standing –  Lindsey (Scott), Ginger (Sharon), Traci (Cathy Jo), Jeffrey and Jason (Bruce),  Danny (Karen), Valerie (Stephen), Amy (Renna), Michele (Robyn), Elizabeth (Renna), Brian (Robyn), Matt (Korbi)(on Brian’s shoulders) and Chad (Renna).  Bottom row – Katie and Chad (Kenneth) Stacey and Brian (Stephen),  Janelle and Nick (Gary).

Times were not always so easy. During World War II, some food wasn’t easy to come by. Not long ago I found a ration book with my mother’s name on it. With seven children to feed from 7 years old to my mother at 18, I’m sure Grandma needed that extra ration book to get the necessary food to keep this family of 9 from going hungry.  Every American was issued a series of ration books during the war. The ration books contained removable stamps good for certain rationed items, like sugar, meat, cooking oil, and canned goods. A person could not buy a rationed item without also giving the grocer the right ration stamp. The books were distributed by a local “board” operated by the Office of Price Administration. “Victory gardens” provided fresh fruit and vegetables. There was always a corner of the back  yard for a garden.

war ration book

 

I will always remember those Sunday afternoons we used to have when we were all together, sharing the best of our everyday lives.

Week #5 – In The Census

 

 

 

 

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – #1 – Start

Obituary for Levi Squires

From the Wisconsin Tobacco Reporter, Edgerton, Wisconsin, Friday, November 24 1882:

Again, we are called upon to chronicle the departure from this life of one of Rock County’s most respected citizens.

Mr. Levi Squires, late of the town of Porter, died at his residence in this village, November 19, 1882. He was born in Caldwell, Warren Co., N.Y. June 22, 1802. In 1839 he removed to Glenns Falls, N.Y. where he resided til 1848, when with his family he came to Wisconsin where he settled on a tract of wild land in the town of Porter. By his own industry it became one of the most desirable homes in Southern Wisconsin, where he resided til a few weeks before his death.

One of the pioneer settlers of the county, he became widely known for his reliable business qualities and integrity of character. In religion, he was a Baptist, which faith he embraced in youth, and ever found hope and consolation in the Bible, which was his companion to the end.

He leaves a widow, two sons and one daughter, who were present during his last hours, to mourn his loss.

The Family

Levi Squires married Sabrina Scofield in New York sometime before 1838, they had three children Edwin R. Squires 1838-1906; Jane Squires 1841- unknown date of death and Eugene Squires 1851-1925. They were all members of the Seventh Day Baptist Church. This “clan” of families, Squires, Scofield, Wheeler, Vaughn and a few others all left New York state and moved to Wisconsin about 1848, settling near the small village of Porter in Rock County, Wisconsin. Much of this history can be found in Roots Webb “They Came To Milton.”

Edwin married Mary Salina (Kenyon) and they had six children: Francis Charlotte 1860-1900; Mary Ivadine 1866-1921; Harvey Leon 1871-1953; Clarence DeLano 1874-1953; Jesse Eugene 1877-1960 and Grace Irene 1879-1933.

Jane Squires married  John Wheeler and they had one child Louis Wheeler and Eugene married Kathryn Pond and they had no children.

In Edwin’s family Francis Charlotte known as Hattie married Wilbur Allen and had four children Mary, Edwin, Jennie and Harvey; Mary Ivadine called Aunt Ivy by Grandma Hancock never married; Harvey married Sarah and they had four children, Jessie Byron, Arthur Byron, Harold and Joseph Squires; Clarence married Mae Florence Russell and they had three children Earl, Roy and Mae Squires Gresham. Jessie Squires never married and Grace Irene Squires married Robert Sidney Foreman and they had four children Mary Frances, Jacob, Margaret and Robert James Foreman.

Although I have met many of the cousins who descend from Clarence Squires it is the Greshams that I keep in touch with to share information such as the recent find of Levi Squires Will and the property owners of the City of Porter, in Rock County, Wisconsin.

Here is the map of the City of Porter in Rock County, Wisconsin. Levi Squires property is just to the right and a little above center. Edwin Squires property is just above Levi Squires.

City of Porter WI land ownership

 

Another interesting find included in the Will for Levi Squires is the letter from Edwin Squires regarding the reading of the will that he was unable to attend. Notice the letterhead which reads Taylor and Squires, Fine Leaf Tobacco.

ER Squires letterhead

My history of the family started in 1998 when my mother and sister, Linda, asked me to visit the library to get copies of records to qualify for the Pioneer license plates.  The search has taken me all the way back to the Mayflower passenger list. I love this unending search for the stories of our family. 

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, #2 – Favorite Photo.

 

 

 

 

 

What’s In A Name?

What’s in a name? Stories. Even if the story is a little far fetched or not quite accurate, a name can tell you a lot.

Here is Jerry’s story.

Signe Viola Stalter and Jerry Frimpter Stalter

Signe Viola Stalter and Jerry Frimpter Stalter

My dad, Jerry Frimpter Stalter, while we were growing up, told us his name was really Perry, not Jerry and that his middle name was not Frimpter but should have been Trimpter. His reason, he told us, was because his mother’s Norwegian accent was difficult to understand and the people at the hospital put down the wrong name for his birth certificate. Ok, dad, good story!

Now for the facts, ma’am just the facts:

Signe Helmeena Anderson

Signe Helmeena (Anderson) Stalter

Jerry’s mother, Signe Helmeena (Anderson) Stalter was born in Bruce, Rusk County,Wisconsin in 1902. Her parents Hinberg and Signe (pronounced Sena) Anderson traveled from Norway to America in 1892. So, it was easy to believe that Signe, the daughter, could have an accent because it was obvious that her parents would have Norwegian accents.

(click on the pictures to make them larger)

Frimpter tombstone

Frimpter Headstone

During my genealogy research I found the family name Frimpter. The Frimpter name was the maiden name of Jerry’s grandmother Sarah (Frimpter) Stalter, mother of Perry Stalter, grandmother to Jerry. Check, question answered. Proof found.

Perry Stalter

Perry Stalter

Even though I had the answer to the Frimpter/Trimpter story I was puzzled by the Perry/Jerry part of the story.

Baptism registration for the Evangelical Lutheran Church of America

Baptism registration for the Evangelical Lutheran Church of America

Well this week was my lucky week. You can sign on to Ancestry through Labor Day for free and I used this opportunity to check out my “hints” since I am no longer a member of Ancestry. I found a reference to the baptism of Jerry Frimpter Stalter and to my surprise he was baptized Perry Frimpter Stalter. Check, question answered. Proof found.

His name probably should have been Perry.

(Growing up, everyone called him “Bud.”)

Makes me feel pretty good about the stories my dad told.

Young Sena and Himberg Anderson

Young Sena and Himberg Anderson

The Second Time Around, Now I know!

Sorting through boxes after our recent move I came across two yearbooks belonging to my mother who graduated from Loveland High School. “The Chieftain” from 1941 and 1943. I was aware I had the yearbooks but I never took the time, until today, to look through and read each page. In the past I have posted many pictures of my mother as a young woman, never being able to date them accurately. The second time around now I know!

The Chieftain 1943

The Class of ’43

   “On the opening day of the 1939-40 school term, 150 bewildered freshmen gathered not in the high school auditorium as was the usual custom, but in the little red church across the street to receive their first instructions. They had no study halls and no assemblies except pep meetings which were held in the grandstand. All of these unusual arrangements were necessary because of the construction work on the new junior high building.”

Loveland High School 1942

   Various school activities included pep rally’s to cheer on the football team which was state champion in 1939 having played against Pueblo on the Loveland field. They marched in the Costume Day parade in downtown Loveland. As sophomore’s in the 1940-41 school term many of the students became contributing members of the football and basketball team and cheerleaders and majorettes.

   The third year at Loveland High School 1941-42 the “juniors” had 18 boys receive their letter in football, and continuing participation in basketball cheerleading and school spirit continued. The class presented the play “Mama’s Baby Boy,” which was a great success.

Evelyn Hancock Junior Year 1942

Evelyn Hancock
Junior Year
1942

  In the forward of the 1943 year book for this class of seniors a warning was included  “WARNING: Due to war conditions, we were not able to get water-proof covers for your year book, so take special care of them. There may be other things in this year book that you do not approve of, but due to shortage of materials and other difficulties, many plans had to be modified.”

   The students returned to school in the fall of 1942 as stately seniors, and as such were allowed to leave the auditorium first.  Again the Loveland Indians brought honors by winning the state championship from the Salida Spartans. Due to the shortage of labor on the farms we began school a week earlier and then allowed two weeks vacation to work in the beet fields. The senior year also included attending school on five Saturdays so the students could end the school year early.

Evelyn Hancock Senior Year 1943

Evelyn Hancock
Senior Year
1943

    “One of the most pleasant memories the seniors of 1943 will carry with them when they leave Loveland High School will be the memory of a class party held on March 12. The party was held in the music room, and dancing and games were the diversion of the evening. Refreshments of pop and doughnuts were served.”

The class sponsor was called back to the Army, leaving mid-term and 6 senior boys left school to serve in World War II.

Future Homemakers Club 1943 Second row, 1st on the left

Future Homemakers Club 1943
Second row, 1st on the left

(click on the pictures to enlarge)

 

Family History Thanksgiving Story 2013 – Mayflower Passenger George Soule

From the Pilgrim Hall Museum

Explore this link to share the stories of the pilgrims and the origin of Thanksgiving.

http://www.pilgrimhallmuseum.org/thanksgiving.htm

Remember our ancestor was George Soule, a servant/teacher for Edward Winslow’s children.

George had been orphaned when his home burned and his parents died. His brother Robert raised him. When he heard of the opportunity to go to the new world, he did so with the Edward Winslow family.

George Soule was a signer of the Mayflower Compact. A document where all of the people agreed to govern as a group.

Read more from the Pilgrim Hall Museum web site.

AT THE FIRST THANKSGIVING:

4 MARRIED WOMEN: Eleanor Billington, Mary Brewster, Elizabeth Hopkins, Susanna White
Winslow.

5 ADOLESCENT GIRLS: Mary Chilton (14), Constance Hopkins (13 or 14), Priscilla Mullins (19),
Elizabeth Tilley (14 or15) and Dorothy, the Carver’s unnamed maidservant, perhaps 18 or 19.

9 ADOLESCENT BOYS: Francis & John Billington, John Cooke, John Crackston, Samuel Fuller
(2d), Giles Hopkins, William Latham, Joseph Rogers, Henry Samson.

13 YOUNG CHILDREN: Bartholomew, Mary & Remember Allerton, Love & Wrestling Brewster,
Humility Cooper, Samuel Eaton, Damaris & Oceanus Hopkins, Desire Minter, Richard More,
Resolved & Peregrine White.

22 MEN: John Alden, Isaac Allerton, John Billington, William Bradford, William Brewster, Peter
Brown, Francis Cooke, Edward Doty, Francis Eaton, [first name unknown] Ely, Samuel Fuller,
Richard Gardiner, John Goodman, Stephen Hopkins, John Howland, Edward Lester, George
Soule, Myles Standish, William Trevor, Richard Warren, Edward Winslow, Gilbert Winslow.

FAMILY GROUPS:
 ALDEN: John
 ALLERTON: Isaac with children Bartholomew, Mary, Remember; the Allerton servant
William Latham
 BILLINGTON: John & Eleanor with sons Francis, John Jr.
 BRADFORD: William
 BREWSTER: William & Mary with sons Love, Wrestling; their ward Richard More
 BROWNE / BROWN: Peter
 CARVER: The Carver ward Desire Minter; the Carver servant John Howland; the Carver
maidservant Dorothy.
 CHILTON: Mary
 COOKE: Francis with son John
 CRACKSTON: John
 EATON: Francis with son Samuel
 ELY: Unknown adult man
 FULLER: Samuel with nephew Samuel 2d
 GARDINER: Richard
 GOODMAN: John
 HOPKINS: Stephen & Elizabeth with Giles, Constance, Damaris, Oceanus; their servants
Edward Doty and Edward Leister.
 MULLINS: Priscilla
 ROGERS: Joseph
 STANDISH: Myles  TILLEY: Elizabeth
 TILLEY: Tilley wards Humility Cooper and Henry Samson
 TREVOR / TREVORE: William
 WARREN: Richard
 WINSLOW: Edward & Susanna with her sons Resolved White & Peregrine White; Winslow
servant George Soule
 WINSLOW: Gilbert
Note: In Of Plymouth Plantation, William Bradford lists the Mayflower passengers and also tells us who died during the
first winter of 1620/1621 and spring of 1621. No other ships arrived in Plymouth until after the “First Thanksgiving”
celebration. The Pilgrims at the “First Thanksgiving” are all the Mayflower survivors.